Study recommends most Uber, Lyft chauffeurs in Seattle not badly paid – ETAuto.com

8July 2020


 The Cornell University study comes as lawmakers in several U.S. cities and states debate the future of the gig economy and whether workers should be treated as employees rather than independent contractors.

The Cornell University study comes as lawmakers in several U.S. cities and states dispute the future of the gig economy and whether workers ought to be dealt with as workers rather than independent contractors. New york city: A lot of ride-hail employees in Seattle are part-time drivers whose revenues are roughly in line with the city’s typical, a research study of information supplied by Uber and Lyft revealed, defying some understandings of drivers working full-time for little pay.The Cornell University study, published on Monday, comes as lawmakers in several U.S. cities and states dispute the future of the gig economy and whether workers must be treated as employees rather than independent contractors.The research study analyzed 14,000 drivers throughout one week in October 2019 and revealed that 75 %of Seattle drivers work fewer than 20 hours per week, with only 5%working full-time. The authors state it was the first time real-world data straight offered by Uber Technologies Inc and Lyft Inc has actually been analyzed.The median driver earned roughly$23.30 per hour after costs and including ideas, compared with Seattle’s typical of roughly$ 25.50. However 8%of motorists made less than Seattle’s base pay of about $16, with that share considerably bigger amongst those who drive only occasionally.The companies paid to cover the university’s research-associated expenses, but did not affect the research study’s method or result, Louis Hyman, a Cornell professor and the lead author, stated in an interview on Wednesday.Hyman stated the findings shocked him, as he anticipated most chauffeurs to be seriously underpaid, but added policymakers may consider

an earnings floor to address those making listed below minimum wage.The Cornell study has been criticized by two scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and New york city’s New School, who likewise evaluated the Seattle ride-hailing market.Using city data and a motorist survey, the scientists found motorists net only about$9.70 an hour, with a 3rd of all motorists working more than 32 hours weekly.

The scientists said Cornell incorrectly included ideas and omitted some of the time chauffeurs spend waiting on a trip request.Hyman reacted that the other scientists wrongly calculated tax rates and said his study was based upon detailed real-world information rather than a sample-sized survey.Also Read:

What Hong Kong’s pandemic experience taught Uber about other cities Source: auto.economictimes.indiatimes.com

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